Let's go back in time

Fort Stockton Heritage Days Oct 14-16

Bryon Garrison

Fort Stockton Living History Days Oct 14-16

Outside the the old jail at Fort Stockton interpreters talk about who got locked up.
Outside the the old jail at Fort Stockton interpreters talk about who got locked up.
(Courier Photo: Bryon Garrison)

The town of Fort Stockton originally served as a camp for the United States military presence. It was established in 1858. The location was a key stopover along the San Antonio-El Paso road due to Comanche Springs an abundant water supply which serves the community to this day. In honor of the towns heritage and founding every year in October Fort Stockton celebrates with Heritage Days. Historical interpreters and vendors gather with their chuck wagons, tee pees and wares to once again invigorate the grassy marching grounds with what life could have been like over one hundred years ago. The spring water provided essential resources for travelers, including the Comanche who maintained their own camp around the springs long before the military had arrived. This arrival reduced the conflicts between Native Americans and settlers. After a brief abandonment of the fort during the Civil War the post was officially called Fort Stockton when it was remanned after the  Civil War. The military post was garrisoned by four companies of the 9th Cavalry including members of the famed Buffalo Soldiers.

Inside the Teepee at Fort Stockton Living History Days.
Inside the Teepee at Fort Stockton Living History Days.
(Courier Photo: Bryon Garrison)

Guests can enjoy the remains of the Fort which feature restored original and reconstructed buildings. The grounds are highlighted by Officer’s Row, the guardhouse, and the enlisted men’s barracks.

The parade grounds, the restored structures and the surviving buildings are what comprise a National Registered Historic District. Living History days explores the life of a soldier with horn blowing, cannon firing and fully uniformed interpreters.  Visitors will learn what troops ate, how they traversed the countryside and when they got a little rambunctious, where they were put to sober up. The Texas Camel Corp also was there with two of their camels.

Living History days feature the Trans Pecos Native Americans, Buffalo soldier re-enactors from Fort Davis and laundresses who were known to pick up and do laundry for the soldiers. The laundress building still stands next to Rooney park.

A Visitors’ Center provides an introduction to the history of the fort and the Historic Fort Stockton Museum, located in Barracks number one and features interpretive exhibits. The fort and parade grounds are located near Rooney Park

 

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